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If you have ever been in a more casual restaurant or bar in the USA, you have probably found out that Americans say “Yes” in a lot of different ways.

Here are five typical expressions that you will hear your waiter say in a restaurant to show you that they heard you and will get you what you ordered.

These expressions can also be used  in any other situation where someone asks you to do something for them.


In a restaurant, this might be an example dialogue:

Waiter: Would you like a dessert today?

Customer: Yes, I’d like the chocolate cake, please.

Waiter: __________

You can use any of the expressions below to fill in that blank. These are in the spoken style. Don’t write these in any academic or business style writing!


You betcha.

This expression can also be used if you are agreeing to a friend’s suggestion or request.

Hungry grumpy girlfriend: Let’s go out to get some dinner!

Boyfriend (doesn’t want a hangry girlfriend): You betcha.

Or

Lazy friend: Could you lend me $5?

Best friend ever: You betcha!


You got it.

This is how you agree to a request.

Hungry guest: Can I have this last piece of cake?

Good host: You got it!


Okie-dokie.

This is the dorky and kind of cutesy cousin of the expression “OK.” You can use it to agree to a suggestion, request or in any other situation you would say OK.

Confused kid: Mom, can you help me with this math problem?

Parent: Okie-dokie, I’ll be there in just a sec. Just let me find my glasses and calculator!


Coming right up.

This is a typical restaurant expression. You would use this when you are delivering something to another person at their request.

Wife from the couch (in front of the TV): Honey? Can you bring me that ice cream from the freezer?

Husband (in the kitchen): Coming right up!


…it is.

This is a way to agree to whatever another person has decided. You first put the thing they have decided and then follow with “it is.”

Husband (finally sits on the couch): I want to watch that new action movie.

Wife (doesn’t care because she is busy eating ice cream): That action movie it is!


Questions? Let me know!

Or sign up for your next online English class to practice more.